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UFO Crash in North Texas
1891

by Mark Murphy and Noe Torres



UFO Crash in North Texas, 1891
Cotton Gin, Circa 1930s (Library of Congress)

Strewn across a field for many yards were “fragments of the most remarkable substance ever known to explode.” Amidst the completely burned grass, weeds, and other vegetation around the area were numerous fragments of what appeared to be metal of a leaden color. In addition, there were “peculiar stones” resembling the lava fragments thrown out by volcanic eruptions. Clearly, the physical evidence lying in this debris field indicated that what exploded here was something other than a meteor. Still, the most amazing find was yet to be made.

As the witness combed through the metallic and lava-like debris, he came across several small fragments of a paper-like substance with printed writing on them. They almost seemed like scraps from a newspaper, except for one important difference – the language was of a character unknown to anyone. Gazing in wonder at the strange writing, the observer became aware that “the language in both was entirely foreign to him, and, in fact, no one has yet been found who has ever seen such a language before.”

Clearly, this part of the story had a deeply emotional impact on the eyewitness, as the newspaper reporter said he “worked himself up to such a pitch of excitement.” In fact, he seemed in a “bewildered fancy” as he recalled the strange debris that he saw littering the area around the Wasson & Miller flour mill and cotton gin.

In a bizarre twist, the newspaper reporter asked to see the scraps with the mysterious writing on them, but the witness became so emotionally overwrought that he was unable to comply with the reporter’s request. He did not even seem to “grasp” the reporter’s desire to be allowed to see the UFO debris.

Slowly over time, the excitement surrounding this amazing incident in Dublin, subsided, and the local residents went back to the harsh reality of daily life on the Texas plains. Six years went by and then another unearthly UFO crash occurred less than 100 miles away in the town of Aurora, Texas, that certainly caused Erath County residents to remember 1891. In the Aurora case, the Dallas Morning News reported, “About 6 o'clock this morning [April 19, 1897] the early risers of Aurora were astonished at the sudden appearance of the airship which has been sailing around the country. It was traveling due north and much nearer the earth than before. Evidently some of the machinery was out of order, for it was making a speed of only ten or twelve miles an hour, and gradually settling toward the earth. It sailed over the public square and when it reached the north part of town it collided with the tower of Judge Proctor's windmill and went into pieces with a terrific explosion, scattering debris over several acres of ground, wrecking the windmill and water tank and destroying the judge's flower garden. The pilot of the ship is supposed to have been the only one aboard and, while his remains were badly disfigured, enough of the original has been picked up to show that he was not an inhabitant of this world.”

The Aurora UFO crash has been called the Roswell incident of Texas, and yet, one could legitimately argue that the 1891 event in Dublin is likely the oldest UFO crash event ever recorded in modern times. The Aurora event, along with the Great Texas Airship sightings of the middle 1890s, has been well documented and reported often, but the Dublin event remains very much a mystery to most UFO researchers and to the general public.

Some historical facts make the believability and extraterrestrial nature of the Dublin exploding UFO very compelling, even for skeptics. At the time, people did not have concepts of unearthly beings, space craft, or even air craft. One must imagine that any type of contact or witnessing of a possible would be depicted in terms of what people of that time knew or had previously experienced. Simple folk of that time would have explained such an event in terms that they knew, floating cotton bales glowing brighter than burning kerosene or similarly. Such a report would be akin to the way Ezekiel described the biblical “wheel in the middle of a wheel” and “like burning coals of fire, and like the appearance of lamps”. This Dublin event was a full seven years before H.G. Wells had written War of the Worlds, and the first widespread depictions of alien beings visiting Earth had emerged to the general public. This event was one year prior to the earliest known version of extraterrestrials first described in The Germ Growers (1892), by Robert Potter. [Ed. See: Wikipedia reference, "Notable invasion literature" in Invasion Literature.]

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